Puritans Composition

Puritans

Chapter 4. notebook

August 17,  2013

Aug 8­1: 18 PM

one particular

Chapter 4. notebook computer

August 17,  2013

Chapter  4

Displaying and Summarizing Quantitative Data�

Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education,  Inc.

Aug 8­1: 18 PM

2

Chapter 4. notebook

August 17,  2013

Dealing With a Lot of Numbers…

• Summarizing the data will help us when we look at large sets� of quantitative data.

• Without summaries of the data,  it's hard to grasp what the� data tell us. �

• The best thing to do is to make a picture…

• We can't use bar charts or pie charts for quantitative data, � since those displays are for categorical variables.

Slide 4 ­ 3

Aug 8­1: 18 PM

three or more

Chapter 4. laptop computer

August 17,  2013

Histograms:  Displaying the Distribution of Earthquake� Magnitudes

*The chapter example discusses earthquake magnitudes.

*First,  slice up the entire span of values covered by the� quantitative variable into equal­width piles called bins. *The bins and the counts in each bin give the distribution of the� quantitative variable.

Slide 4 ­ 4

Aug 8­1: 18 PM

4

Chapter 4. notebook

August 17,  2013

Histograms:  Displaying the Distribution

of Earthquake Magnitudes (cont. )

• A histogram plots the bin�

counts as the heights of�

bars (like a bar chart).

• It displays the distribution�

at a glance.

• Here is a histogram of�

earthquake magnitudes:

Slide 4 ­ 5

Aug 8­1: 18 PM

5

Chapter 4. notebook

August 17,  2013

Histograms:  Displaying the Distribution

of Earthquake Magnitudes (cont. )

• A relative frequency histogram displays the percentage of� cases in each bin instead of the count. �

• In this way,  relative frequency histograms                                  � are faithful to the                                                                 � area principle.

Here is a relative�

frequency histogram of                                                                   � earthquake magnitudes:

Slide 4 ­ 6

Aug 8­1: 18 PM

6

Chapter 4. notebook

August 17,  2013

Stem­and­Leaf Displays

• Stem­and­leaf displays show the distribution�

of a quantitative variable,  like histograms do, �

while preserving the individual values.

• Stem­and­leaf displays contain all the�

information found in a histogram and,  when�

carefully drawn,  satisfy the area principle and�

show the distribution.

Slide 4 ­ 7

Aug 8­1: 18 PM

7

Chapter 4. notebook

August 17,  2013

Stem­and­Leaf Example

• Compare the histogram and stem­and­leaf�

display for the pulse rates of 24 women at a�

health clinic.  Which graphical display do you�

like? �

Slide 4 ­ 8

Aug 8­1: 18 PM

8

Chapter 4. notebook

August 17,  2013

Constructing a Stem­and­Leaf Display

• Initial,  cut each data value into leading digits�

(" stems”) and trailing digits (" leaves”). �

• Use the stems to label the bins.

• Use only one digit for each leaf—either round or� truncate the data values to one decimal place�

after the stem.

Slide 4 ­ 9

Aug 8­1: 18 PM

9

Chapter 4. notebook

August 17,  2013

Dotplots

• A dotplot is a simple�

display.  It just places�

a dot along an axis for�

each case in the data.

• The dotplot to the�

right shows Kentucky�

Derby winning times, �

plotting each race as�

its own dot.

• You might see a�

dotplot displayed�

horizontally or�

vertically.

Slide 4 ­ 10

Aug 8­1: 18 PM

12

Chapter 4. notebook

August 17,  2013

Think Before You Draw,  Again

• Remember the " Make a picture” rule? �

• Now that we have options for data displays,  you� need to Think carefully about which type of display� to make.

• Before making a stem­and­leaf display,  a�

histogram,  or a dotplot,  check the:

> Quantitative Data Condition:  The data are�

values of a quantitative variable whose units�

are known.

Slide 4 ­ 11

Aug 8­1: 18 PM

10

Chapter 4. laptop computer

August 17,  2013

Shape,  Center,  and Spread

• When describing a distribution,  make sure to�...