Comparison of «Feliks Skrzynecki» and «Post Card» Essay

Comparison of "Feliks Skrzynecki" and "Post Card"

How do the two poems " Feliks Skrzynecki” and " 10 Mary Street” by simply Peters Skrzynecki convey the changing perception of belonging of different people of Peter's family? Both the poems by Peters Skrzynecki, " Feliks Skrzynecki” and " twelve Mary Street” paint a picture of a migrant family in which the father and son will vary perceptions of their belonging resulting from their different cultural experiences. In addition , their thoughts about that belong change with time. This changing sense of belonging can be conveyed effectively through a various poetic equipment such as: images, metaphors, similes and hyperboles. To start with, the poem " 10 Jane Street” describes a concurrence of the two cultures – Polish and Australian. The image of Philip in his " little Saint Patrick's College cap, ” " ravaging” their Shine garden packed with fruit and vegetables paints a picture of the happy child years when Philip appears to accept both his Polish historical past and Australian culture. The of the hat links him to Aussie education and symbolises Peter's assimilation in to the Australian contemporary society. Similarly, his use of a great Australian idiom to describe the parents' visitors' smoking habit, " … smoked such as a dozen Puffing Billies, " again implies that culturally he belongs to Australia. At the same time, the image of his parents who also " Stored pre-war The european union alive, ” socialised with Polish " visitors that ate kielbasa … and drank uncooked vodka, ” implies that the parents' Polish culture rules their existence. But it would not frustrate the boy. Peter willingly participates in both equally cultures. Peter's attitude alterations with time. The poem " Feliks Skrzynecki” explores the growing anxiety between the daddy and the child, nonexistent inside the poem " 10 Jane Street. ” The young man is more than willing not only to accept the brand new country but also to surrender his father's Polish heritage. Peter develops a feeling of alienation that comes from his educational and cultural context - he is a son of migrants who have never gone to Poland,...